Residential | Frequently Asked Questions about Alternate Corridors
 

Frequently Asked Questions about Alternate Corridors

What are alternate corridors?

As part of the Power Plant Siting Act (PPSA) review and approval process, non-FPL entities have an opportunity to submit alternatives to the transmission corridors proposed by FPL. While these “alternate corridors” are not proposed by FPL, it is important to note that outside parties have the right to submit alternatives through the PPSA review process. While we welcome an open and robust discussion about how to most appropriately serve our customers, based on our extensive study of the issue, we believe the corridors we proposed strike a good balance of land use, engineering, environmental and cost issues.

Before submitting the application, FPL conducted an extensive study of many possible routes and received feedback from the community to understand their preferences. The public expressed a preference to co-locate new transmission lines with existing rights-of-way and away from homes and schools. FPL’s proposed corridors recognize these preferences.

One of the strengths of Florida’s Electrical Power Plant Siting Act is that it provides for the expression of different opinions throughout the process; one example of this is the opportunity for interested parties to identify alternate transmission corridors and have those corridors considered at the same level as those proposed by FPL.

Alternate Corridors

How many alternate corridors will be considered in the process?
Who filed the proposed alternate corridor for the eastern route?
Who filed the proposed alternate corridor for the western route?
Where can I find detailed information about the alternate corridors that were filed?
What are the next steps in the review process for the alternate corridors?
What does the administrative law judge take into consideration to issue a recommended order on the certification?
Who makes the final decision?

Alternate Corridors

How many alternate corridors will be considered in the process?

Two alternate corridors will be reviewed in the licensing process. One alternate corridor was proposed for the eastern route and one alternate corridor was proposed for the western route.

Who filed the proposed alternate corridor for the eastern route?

The proposed alternate corridor for the eastern route was filed by the Village of Pinecrest and the City of Coral Gables.

Who filed the proposed alternate corridor for the western route?

The proposed alternate corridor for the western route was filed by the Miami-Dade Limestone Products Association, representing the interests of the limestone mining and processing companies in the northwest portion of Miami-Dade County in an area commonly referred to as the Lake Belt Area.

Where can I find detailed information about the alternate corridors that were filed?

More information on each proposed alternate corridor can be found in each party’s filing with the State of Florida Division of Administrative Hearings at the DOAH website: www.doah.state.fl.us (Docket #09-3575)

What are the next steps in the review process for the alternate corridors?

The proposed alternate corridors will be reviewed by the same agencies that are reviewing FPL’s application and any local governments through whose jurisdiction the alternate corridor passes.

Reviewing agencies will prepare reports on the alternate corridors indicating their recommended approval, denial or approval with conditions. After review by the regulatory agencies and local governments, FPL’s proposed corridors and the proposed alternate corridors will be reviewed in a certification hearing presided over by an administrative law judge. The hearing is currently expected to take place in May 2012.

What does the administrative law judge take into consideration to issue a recommended order on the certification?

The judge will hear from the public, as well as testimony and evidence offered by all parties, on which corridor should be certified. Considering a balance of land use, environmental, engineering, cost and other factors, the judge will issue a recommended order on the certification, including the identification of the corridors recommended for certification.

Who makes the final decision?

The recommended order will be submitted to the Governor and Cabinet, who will make the final decision about granting certification for the project and about which corridors should receive certification.


For answers to general questions about the project, click here.