FPL | TRI 2006 Report
 

TRI 2006 Report

When the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency began including electric utilities in the reporting requirement on chemical use called Toxic Release Inventory, FPL saw it as an important opportunity to have dialogue with the communities in which we operate. Today our employees routinely meet with interested individuals and groups throughout our service territory to share information on FPL's overall environmental performance, including:

  • FPL is one of the cleanest electric utilities in the country. We are the second largest user of natural gas and operate two nuclear plants, which have virtually no air emissions.
  • FPL strives to make operations even cleaner, more efficient and cost-effective by making incremental improvements to our existing power plants when practicable.
  • We also plan 10 years or more in advance to meet growth and increased use of electricity with state-of-the-art new plants that are equipped with the best and most advanced pollution control equipment available.
  • To learn more about our plans for the future, please tour FPL’s current power plant projects.

As part of FPL's community outreach, employees also provided the following information on TRI releases to be reported to EPA. For more information, see 2006 Toxic Release Inventory Releases for FPL Utility.

 

Chemical

Description

Approximate Releases

2003

2004

2005

2006

Sulfuric Acid Aerosol

A common example of sulfuric acid is as the main ingredient in car batteries. Sulfur is naturally present in oil that is burned to produce electricity. Electric utilities have been reporting sulfur dioxide emissions for years. Sulfur combines with oxygen in the furnace and eventually converts into a mist containing dilute sulfuric acid.

1.9 million lbs.

1.96 million lbs.

2.0 million lbs.

1.2 million lbs.

Hydrochloric Acid Aerosols (HCL)

One example of hydrochloricacid is its use in adjusting pH in swimming pools. This chemical is formed in power plants when the fuel's natural chloride combines with hydrogen in the furnace and eventually forms a mist.

595,000 lbs.

355,000 lbs.

436,000 lbs.

182,000 lbs.

Vanadium Compounds

Vanadium compounds are used in ceramic coloring material, x-rays, manufacture of alloy steels, photographic developer, and inhibition of UV transmission in glass.

Vanadium compounds are found in the ash produced from combustion of fuel oil. Most of the ash is "recycled" into commercial products.

589,000 lbs.

342,000 lbs.

343,000 lbs.

169,000 lbs.

Nickel Compounds

Nickel is found in many food products as well as emitted by volcanoes, forest fires and vegetation. Power plant emissions are equal to about four percent of natural nickel emissions. Nickel is found in the ash produced from combustion of fuel oil. Most of the ash is "recycled" into commercial products.

62,000 lbs.

75,600 lbs.

73,900 lbs.

na

Nitrate Compounds

Nitrate Compounds are a common fuel oil additive to maintian cleaniliness in the furnace and aid in fuel combustion.

not reportable

not reportable

0 lbs.

0 lbs.

Ammonia

Ammonia is used in multiple chemical processes plus commonly used as as a fertilizer ingredient. It is also one of the refrigerants commonly used in refrigeration units .

not reportable

not reportable

not reportable

8,800 lbs

Mercury Compounds

Mercury is a naturally occurring metal. It is used in thermometers, blood pressure gauges, dental fillings, fluorescent light fixtures, batteries, electrical equipment and fungicides. Small concentrations of mercury are found in fuel oil. [less than 0.3% of all the mercury brought into the State of Florida in the past 70 years]

37 lbs.

71.96 lbs.

79.70 lbs.

101.79 lbs.

Benzo(A) Anthracene (PAC)

This compound is present in fuel oil. Because we "otherwise use" more than 10,000 lbs. of this fuel element, an estimated release was calculated.

9.00 lbs.

21.95 lbs.

21.36 lbs.

10.87 lbs.

Chlorine, chlorine dioxide and hydrazine

These chemicals are used in boiler water and power plant water cooling systems. not reportable not reportable not reportable not reportable

Lead

This compound is present in fuel oil. Because we "otherwise use" more than 10,000 lbs. of this fuel element, an estimated release was calculated.

1,920 lbs.

2,051.77 lbs

1,971 lbs.

109.00 lbs.

Dioxins

During the 1960s and 1970s dioxin was used and released by the pesticide, manufacturing and municipal waste industries. Dioxin levels have reduced by approximately 80% since that time due to regulatory action. Power plant emissions may contain about one percent of manmade dioxin emissions.

21.00 grams

14.073 grams

15.38 grams

7.69 grams

Naphthalene

This compound is a naturally occuring hydrocarbon found in fuel oil. It is best known as the primary ingredient of mothballs. It is also used in the manufacture of plastics, dyes and solvents. It is also used as an antiseptic and insecticide.

not reportable

709 lbs.

691 lbs.

74 lbs.

Asbestos

A common fire protective that many years ago was used to coat steam lines and used in older buildings as fire proofing. Most asbestos has been safely removed from all of our power plants. We occasionally find some asbestos in old equipment or buildings that is removed and disposed of per federal regulation.

not reportable

0 lbs.

not reportable

0 lbs.

Previous reports:

2005 Toxic Release Inventory Releases for FPL Utility.

2004 Toxic Release Inventory Releases for FPL Utility.

2003 Toxic Release Inventory Releases for FPL Utility.

For additional information on TRI, visit the Environmental Protection Agency's Web site.